SHADRACK BOND, Illinois' first governor was born in Fredericktown, Maryland, on November 24, 1773. His education was limited and attained in the common schools of Maryland. Bond moved to Monroe County, Illinois, where he balanced farming with an equally successful political career. He served as a member of the legislative council of the Indiana Territory from 1805 to 1808, was appointed St. Clair County justice of the peace on December 9, 1809, and was named judge of the Court of Common Pleas for St. Clair County on April 4, 1812. He served as an Illinois territorial delegate to the U.S. House of Representatives from 1812 to 1814, and was receiver of public monies in the Kaskaskia general land office, serving from 1814 to 1818. Bond also served in the military. He was commissioned lieutenant colonel commandant of the militia on May 3, 1809, and on March 7, 1812, was appointed an aide-de-camp to the commander-in-chief of the Illinois territorial militia. A popular vote and running unopposed elected Bond elected governor of Illinois on September 19, 1818. He was sworn into office on October 6, 1818. During his tenure, the State Bank of Illinois was authorized, a revenue law was instituted, and the state capital was moved to Vandalia. Governor Bond advocated for the construction of a canal connecting Lake Michigan and the Illinois River, supported an amendment of newly formed state laws, and endorsed advancing road and bridge construction, with a strong focus around the capital. Bond did not seek reelection due to the Illinois Constitution of 1818, which disallowed a governor from succeeding himself. He left office on December 5, 1822. On December 5, 1823, he was named register of the land office for the district of Kaskaskia, a position he held until his death. Governor Shadrack Bond passed away on April 12, 1832, and he is buried in the Evergreen Cemetery in Chester, Illinois.

Sources:

Sobel, Robert, and John Raimo, eds. Biographical Directory of the Governors of the United States, 1789-1978, Vol. 1, Westport, Conn.; Meckler Books, 1978. 4 vols.

Portrait & Biographical Album of Sangamon County, Illinois

Biographical Dictionary of the U.S. Congress

Illinois Periodicals Online