CLYDE M. REED, the twenty-fourth governor of Kansas, was born near Champaign, Illinois on October 9, 1871. His family moved to Kansas in 1875, settling in Labette County. He was educated in the public school system, where he earned a teaching certificate. After teaching for a year, Reed established a thirty-year career with the railway mail service. He also was the publisher of the newspaper, the Parsons Sun. He entered public service in 1919, serving as the secretary to Governor Allen. He also served on the Kansas Industrial Court from 1920 to 1921, and was a member of the Public Utilities Commission from 1921 to 1924. Reed won the 1928 Republican gubernatorial nomination, and was sworn into the governorship on January 14, 1929. During his tenure, the Great Depression had started, however, several acts were authorized before the full effects of the collapse were felt. The "blue sky" law was improved, the public service commission was restructured, and a new highway commission was created, as well as a labor and industry commission and a new tax commission. Also, the old intangible tax law was abolished in an effort to control certain procedures of banks and loan companies. Reed lost his reelection bid and left office on January 12, 1931. He later was elected to the U.S. Senate, where he served from January 3, 1939 until his death in 1949. Governor Clyde M. Reed passed away on November 8, 1949, and was buried at the Oakwood Cemetery.

Sources:

Sobel, Robert, and John Raimo, eds. Biographical Directory of the Governors of the United States, 1789-1978, Vol. 2, Westport, Conn.; Meckler Books, 1978. 4 vols.

Biographical Directory of the U.S. Congress

Kansas Press Association