WILBUR M. BRUCKER, the thirty-second governor of Michigan, was born in Saginaw, Michigan on June 23, 1894. His early education was attained in the public schools of his native state, and later at the University of Michigan, where he earned a law degree in 1916. In the conflict against Pancho Villa on the Mexican border, Brucker served with the 33rd Infantry of the Michigan National Guard.  He also served overseas during World War I, participating in the Army's occupation of Germany. After his military service, Brucker entered into a political career. He was first elected in 1919, serving as the assistant prosecuting attorney of Saginaw County. He also served as the prosecuting attorney from 1923 to 1926, was the assistant attorney general of Michigan from 1926 to 1928, and served as the attorney general of Michigan from 1928 to 1930. Brucker next secured the Republican gubernatorial nomination, and was elected governor by a popular vote in 1930. During his tenure, the state police force was increased; a new state police headquarters in Lansing was authorized; and legislation was sanctioned that allowed a grand jury to scrutinize municipal fraud. After running unsuccessfully for reelection, Brucker left office on January 1, 1933. He later secured an appointment as general counsel of the U.S. Department of Defense, a position held in 1954.  He also served as secretary of the Army from 1955 to 1961. Governor Wilbur M. Brucker passed away on October 28, 1968, and was buried in the Arlington National Cemetery in Arlington, Virginia.

Sources:

Sobel, Robert, and John Raimo, eds. Biographical Directory of the Governors of the United States, 1789-1978, Vol. 2, Westport, Conn.; Meckler Books, 1978. 4 vols.

University of Michigan Library

The Political Graveyard