ALBERT O. BROWN, the sixty-seventh governor of New Hampshire, was born in Northwood, New Hampshire on July 18, 1853. His education was attained at Dartmouth College, where he graduated in 1878, and at Boston University, where he earned a law degree in 1884. Brown established a successful legal career, serving as the New Hampshire special counsel that represented the state in the Supreme Court railroad tax appeal case. He first entered politics as chairman of the State Tax Commission, a position he held from 1911 to 1921. He also presided over the State Constitutional Convention from 1918 to 1921. Brown next secured the Republican gubernatorial nomination, and was elected governor by a popular vote in 1920. During his tenure, the state deficit was reduced; taxes were cut; and the state highway system was improved. After declining to run for a second term, Brown served as a delegate-at-large to the 1924 Republican National Convention. He also served as a member of the New Hampshire General Court from 1925 to 1926, as well as serving as a trustee for Dartmouth College. Governor Albert O. Brown passed away on March 28, 1937 in Manchester, New Hampshire.

Sources:

New Hampshire Division of Historical Resources

The Political Graveyard

Sobel, Robert, and John Raimo, eds. Biographical Directory of the Governors of the United States, 1789-1978, Vol. 3, Westport, Conn.; Meckler Books, 1978. 4 vols.

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