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Governor John Hubbard

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Office Dates:  May 09, 1850 - Jan 05, 1853

Born:  Mar 22, 1794

Passed:  Feb 06, 1869

Birth State:  Louisiana

Party:  Democrat

Family:  Married Sarah Hodge Barrett; six children

School(s):  Dartmouth College; University of Pennsylvania

Physician/Dentist


JOHN HUBBARD, the twenty-second governor of Maine, was born in Readfield, Maine on March 22, 1794. His education was attained at Dartmouth College, where he graduated in 1816, and at the University of Pennsylvania, where he earned a M.D. degree in 1822. After establishing medical practices in Virginia and Maine, Hubbard entered into a career in politics, serving as a member of the Maine State Senate from 1842 to 1843. Hubbard won the 1849 Democratic gubernatorial nomination, and then went on to win the general election. In 1850, he was reelected to a second term, which by a constitutional amendment was extended to January 1853. During his tenure, the establishment of an agricultural college, as well as a women's college and a reform school were supported; the elimination of unfair state laws was advocated for, and the call for free lands within the state was endorsed. Also, the controversial Maine Law was sanctioned in 1851, which played a part in his 1852 reelection defeat. After leaving office on January 5, 1853, Hubbard later served as a special treasury agent for the inspection of the Maine Custom House, a position he held from 1857 to 1859. After serving as a commissioner under the Reciprocity Treaty from 1859 to 1861, Hubbard retired from public service. Governor John Hubbard passed away on February 6, 1869.

Sources:

Sobel, Robert, and John Raimo, eds. Biographical Directory of the Governors of the United States, 1789-1978, Vol. 2, Westport, Conn.; Meckler Books, 1978. 4 vols.

Governors of the State of Maine

Bowdoin College Library

The Rootsweb