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Governor William Sulzer

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Office Dates:  Jan 01, 1913 - Oct 17, 1913

Resigned

Born:  Mar 18, 1863

Passed:  Nov 06, 1941

Birth State:  New Jersey

Party:  Democratic

Family:  Married Clara Rodelheim

School(s):  Columbia College

National Office(s) Served:  Representative


WILLIAM SULZER, the forty-second governor of New York, was born in Elizabeth, New Jersey on March 18, 1863. His early education was attained in the New Jersey public schools, and later he attended Columbia College. He went on to study law, and then established his legal career in New York City. Sulzer first entered politics in 1889, serving as a member of the New York House of Representatives, a position he held five years. He also served as speaker of the house in 1893; was a delegate to the Democratic National Conventions from 1892 to 1912; and served as a member of the U.S. House of Representatives from 1895 to 1912. Sulzer next secured the Democratic gubernatorial nomination, and was elected governor by a popular vote on November 5, 1912. During his tenure, his efforts to remove Tammany Hall influences in state government resulted in an investigation that discovered fraud in his own campaign contributions. After impeachment charges were brought against him, Sulzer was removed from office on October 17, 1913. Later that same year, he won election as an Independent to the New York House of Representatives. After a failed bid for the governorship in 1914, Sulzer retired from political life. He continued to stay active in his legal practice. Governor William Sulzer passed away on November 6, 1941, and was buried in the Evergreen Cemetery in Hillside, New Jersey.

Sources:

Sobel, Robert, and John Raimo, eds. Biographical Directory of the Governors of the United States, 1789-1978, Vol. 3, Westport, Conn.; Meckler Books, 1978. 4 vols.

Biographical Directory of the U.S. Congress

Wikipedia