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Governor Daniel D. Tompkins

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Office Dates:  Jul 01, 1807 - Feb 24, 1817

Resigned

Born:  Jun 21, 1774

Passed:  Jun 11, 1825

Birth State:  New York

Party:  Jeffersonian-Republican

Family:  Married Hannah Minthorne; eight children

School(s):  Columbia College

National Office(s) Served:  Vice President


DANIEL D. TOMPKINS, the fifth governor of New York and vice president of the United States, was born in Scarsdale, New York on June 21, 1774. His education was attained at Columbia College, where he graduated in 1795. He went on to study law, and in 1797 was admitted to the bar. After establishing his legal career in New York City, Tompkins entered into politics. In 1801 he served as a delegate to the New York Constitutional Convention. He also served as a member of the New York Assembly from 1803 to 1804. In 1804 he was elected to the U.S. House of Representatives, but resigned his seat, serving instead on the New York Supreme Court bench, a position he held from 1804 to 1807. Tompkins next won election to the New York governorship in 1807, and went on to win reelection in 1810, 1813, and 1815. During his tenure, educational and penal reform measures were lobbied for; the War of 1812 was endorsed; and the militia system was reorganized. Tompkins resigned from the governorship on February 24, 1817, having been elected to the vice presidency of the United States, a position he held from 1817 to 1825. He also served as a member and president of the 1821 State Constitutional Convention. Governor Daniel D. Tompkins passed away on June 11, 1825, and was buried in the St. Mark's Churchyard in New York City, New York.

Sources:

Sobel, Robert, and John Raimo, eds. Biographical Directory of the Governors of the United States, 1789-1978, Vol. 3, Westport, Conn.; Meckler Books, 1978. 4 vols.

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