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Governor John Tyler Jr.

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Office Dates:  Dec 10, 1825 - Mar 03, 1827

Born:  Mar 28, 1790

Passed:  Jan 17, 1862

Birth State:  Virginia

Party:  Democratic-Republican

Family:  Married twice--Letitia Christian; Julia Gardiner; seven children by his first marriage and seven children by his second marriage

School(s):  College of William and Mary

National Office(s) Served:  Representative, Senator, Vice President, President

Military Service:  Army


Born in Charles City County, Virginia, JOHN TYLER JR. received a bachelor of arts degree from the College of William and Mary in Williamsburg and then studied and practiced law before being elected to five consecutive terms in the Virginia House of Delegates. He served as a Captain in the Virginia Militia in 1813 and as a member of the Virginia Council of State in 1816 before being elected to fill a vacancy in the U.S. House of Representatives. He was reelected a U.S. Representative twice and then elected once again to the Virginia House of Delegates for three consecutive terms. He was chosen by the state legislature to serve as governor. During his gubernatorial administration, he recommended the establishment of a statewide public school system. He resigned after being elected to the U.S. Senate, where he served from 1827 to 1835, serving as President Pro Tempore his final year in office. He was a nominee for Vice President of the United States on the Whig ticket in 1838. Although unsuccessful, he was elected Vice President in 1840 and became President of the United States in April 1841 upon the death of William Henry Harrison. At the end of his presidential term, Tyler retired to his estate until the outbreak of the Civil War, during which he served as a delegate to, and chairman of, the Peace Conference held in Washington, D.C. in February 1861, a member of the Virginia Convention called to consider secession in March 1861, and a member of the Provisional Congress of the Confederacy in 1861. He was elected a member of the Confederate House of Representatives but died before they met.

Sources:

Chitwood, Oliver Perry. John Tyler: Champion of the Old South. Newtown, CT: American Political Biography Press, 1996, c1939.

Crapol, Edward P. John Tyler: The Accidental President. Chapel Hill: the University of North Carolina Press, c2006.

Garraty, John A. and Carnes, Mark C., eds. American National Biography, Volume 22. New York: Oxford University Press, 1999.

Library of Virginia, Papers of John Tyler (1790-1862). Accession 28623. Library of Virginia, Richmond, VA 23219.

Malone, Dumas, eds. Dictionary of American Biography, Vol. XIX. New York: Charles Scribner’s Sons, 1943.

National Cyclopaedia of American Biography, Vol. VI. New York: James T. White & Co., 1896.

Smith, Margaret Vowell. Virginia, 1492-1892: A History of the Executives. Washington, D.C.: W. H. Lowdermilk & Co., 1893.

Sobel, Robert, and John Raimo, eds. Biographical Directory of the Governors of the United States, 1789-1978, Vol. 4. Westport, CT: Meckler Books, 1978. 4 vols

Tyler, Lyon Gardiner. Encyclopedia of Virginia Biography, Vol. II. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., 1998.

Virginia Biographical Dictionary, Vol. 2. St. Clair Shores, MI: Somerset Publishers, Inc.

Virginia Historical Society Library. John Tyler Papers (Part 1), 1723-1961. Accession OCLC: 31752200. Virginia Historical Society, Richmond, VA.

Walker, Jane C. John Tyler: A President of Many Firsts. Blacksburg, VA: McDonald & Woodward, 2001.

Relation to Another Governor