Edward Everett

Gov. Edward Everett

Massachusetts

Term(s)
January 13, 1836 - January 18, 1840

Born
April 11, 1794

Passed
January 15, 1865

Party
Whig

School(s)
Harvard University; University of Gottingen

Birth State
Massachusetts

National Office(s) Served:
Representative, Senator, Cabinet secretary, Ambassador

Family:
Married Charlotte Gray Brooks; five children

BIO

EDWARD EVERETT, the sixteenth governor of Massachusetts, was born in Dorchester, Massachusetts on April 11, 1794. His education was attained at Harvard University, where he graduated in 1811, and three years later earned a M.A. degree in divinity. Before going to Germany, where he earned a doctorate from the University of Gottingen, Everett served as pastor of the Brattle Street Unitarian Church. Returning home, he took a teaching position at Harvard, and later became the editor of the North American Review. Everett entered politics in 1825, serving as a member of the U.S. House of Representatives, a position he held ten years. He next won election to the governorship on November 9, 1835. He was reelected in 1836, 1837 and 1838. During his tenure, legislation was authorized that limited liquor sales and consumption, however the passage of this bill played a part in Everett’s 1839 reelection defeat. After leaving office on January 18, 1840, Everett served as the U.S. minister to England from 1841 to 1845, and was the president of Harvard University from 1846 to 1849. He also secured an appointment in President Fillmore’s cabinet, serving as secretary of state from 1852 to 1853, was a member of the U.S. Senate from 1853 to 1854, and was an unsuccessful vice presidential candidate in 1860. Governor Edward Everett passed away on January 15, 1865, and was buried in the Mount Auburn Cemetery in Cambridge, Massachusetts.

Source

Sobel, Robert, and John Raimo, eds. Biographical Directory of the Governors of the United States, 1789-1978, Vol. 2, Westport, Conn.; Meckler Books, 1978. 4 vols.

Biographical Directory of the U.S. Congress

Interactive State House

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