CHARLES ANDERSON, the twenty-seventh governor of Ohio, was born near Louisville, Kentucky on June 1, 1814. His education was attained at Miami University, where he graduated in 1833. He went on to study law, and then established his legal career in Dayton, Ohio, serving one-term as the Montgomery County prosecuting attorney. Anderson first entered politics as a member of the Ohio State Senate, a position he won election to in 1844. When his health began to fail, he moved his family to San Antonio, Texas, where he became a vocal supporter of the Union and the approaching war. After the outbreak of war, Anderson fled to Mexico, but he was arrested and then imprisoned. He later escaped, and then was sent by President Lincoln to boost support for the Union cause in England. After returning to the United States, he served as a colonel in the 93rd Ohio Volunteer Infantry. He fought in the Battle of Stones River, where he was severely wounded. After resigning from his military commission, Anderson returned to his political career. From 1863 to 1865 he served as the lieutenant governor of Ohio. On August 29, 1865 Governor John Brough died in office, and Anderson, who was the lieutenant governor at the time, assumed the duties of the governorship. During his short tenure, war issues were dealt with. After leaving the governorship, Anderson retired from political life. He continued to stay active in Dayton legal practice. Governor Charles Anderson passed away on September 2, 1895, and was buried in the Kuttawa Cemetery in Kuttawa, Kentucky.

SOURCES:

Sobel, Robert, and John Raimo, eds. Biographical Directory of the Governors of the United States, 1789-1978, Vol. 3, Westport, Conn.; Meckler Books, 1978. 4 vols.

The Ohio Historical Center

Wikipedia.org