CHARLES E. HUGHES, the thirty-ninth governor of New York, was born in Glens Falls, New York on April 11, 1862. His education was attained at Madison University, at Brown University, where he graduated in 1880, and at Columbia University, where he earned a law degree. He established a successful legal practice in New York City, as well as serving as the legislative counsel that uncovered irregularities in the insurance and utility industries. Hughes first entered politics as the 1906 Republican gubernatorial candidate. He went on to win the November 6th general election, and was reelected to a second term in 1908. During his tenure, a workmen’s compensation bill was sanctioned; a public service commission was established; and insurance and labor laws were improved. Hughes resigned from the governorship on October 6, 1910, upon his appointment to the U.S. Supreme Court, a position he held until 1916. That same year, he ran for the presidency of the United States on the Republican ticket, however, he lost to Woodrow Wilson in one of the closest presidential elections. In 1921, he secured an appointment to served as secretary of state, an office he held under both Presidents Harding and Coolidge. From 1926 to 1930 he served on the Permanent Court of Arbitration; and from 1928 to 1930 he was a judge on the Permanent Court of International Justice. Hughes finished his career with service as the chief justice of the U.S. Supreme Court, a post he held from 1930 to 1941. Governor Charles E. Hughes passed away on August 27, 1948, and was buried in the Woodland Cemetery in the Bronx, New York.

Sources:

Sobel, Robert, and John Raimo, eds. Biographical Directory of the Governors of the United States, 1789-1978, Vol. 3, Westport, Conn.; Meckler Books, 1978. 4 vols.

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