THEODORE ROOSEVELT, the thirty-sixth governor of New York and vice president and president of the United States, was born in New York City on October 27, 1858. His education was attained at Harvard University, where he graduated in 1880, and at Columbia University, where he studied law. Roosevelt first entered politics in 1882, serving as a member of the New York House of Representatives, a position he held two years. His political career was temporarily interrupted when he moved to a North Dakota ranch after the death of his wife. After returning to New York, he served on the U.S. civil service commission from 1889 to 1895, as well as serving as president of the New York board of police commissioners. He also served as the assistant secretary of the navy from 1897 to 1898. When war broke out with Spain, Roosevelt went to Cuba and led a volunteer regiment that became recognized as the Rough Riders. After his military service, he secured the Republican gubernatorial nomination, and was elected governor on November 8,1898. During his tenure, park and forestry programs were advanced; labor laws were improved; public utility earnings were taxed; and banking and insurance laws were strengthened. After leaving the governorship, Roosevelt served as the vice president of the United States. President McKinley was assassinated on September 14, 1901, and Roosevelt, who was the vice president at the time, succeeded to the presidency. In 1904 he was elected to a term of his own. After leaving the White House, Roosevelt ran unsuccessfully for reelection on the 1912 and 1916 Progressive Party ticket. Governor Theodore Roosevelt, who was the author of twenty-six books and numerous articles, passed away on January 6, 1919. He was buried in the Young Memorial Cemetery in Oyster Bay, New York.

Sources:

Sobel, Robert, and John Raimo, eds. Biographical Directory of the Governors of the United States, 1789-1978, Vol. 3, Westport, Conn.; Meckler Books, 1978. 4 vols.

Biographical Directory of the U.S. Congress

The Nobel Foundation